Friday, December 6th 2019, 7:32 am – How an early season snowfall is impacting some of

Friday, December 6th 2019, 7:32 am – How an early season snowfall is impacting some of Ontario’s corn harvest The wind blew through the browned stalks, carrying with it tiny grains of snow that had begun to build-up on the ground and on golden cobs that poked out of once-green protective sheaths on corn plant leaves. The valuable cobs had not yet been harvested. That’s when I realized I had no idea how farmers dealt with early-season snow. How did an early snowfall affect harvest? Did the farmers leave the corn out there and write-off their losses? Did they have other methods to pull the crop off the field despite the snow? How did the corn get off the field and into the tens of thousands of products that we use every day? Thanks to Twitter and some fans of mine, I was introduced to Scott Timmings of TimStar Farms and on a warm, dry day in November, I headed out to Rockwood to find out how farmers dealt with the unusual weather. I arrived in a pall of dust that blew up from around the massive tires of the combine as its driver, Grant Taylor, swung it back and forth through the corn stalks of the field. The snow that had fallen earlier in the month had melted away and...

Norris Sales’ new facility in Plymouth Meeting, Pa., is 55,000 sq. ft. on approximately 6 acres.

Norris Sales’ new facility in Plymouth Meeting, Pa., is 55,000 sq. ft. on approximately 6 acres. To get a sense of just how big it is, an NFL football field (end zones included), is approximately 57,000 sq. ft. on just over 1 acre of land. The new site is almost double the size of the company’s previous location. In addition to consolidating five buildings into one, some highlights include a showroom that can hold three times the amount of products and nine service bays that house two 5-ton (4.5 t) overhead bridge cranes and 2-ton (1.8 t) jibs. The employees are really proud and delighted to be here every day, according to Karen Zajick, Norris Sales president and treasurer. “The new facility also makes it easier for our customers,” she said. “Now they can come to one location where parts and service are conveniently co-located. They no longer have to drive from one building to another to get the products they need.” “We really hope that this building elevates our service and provides every customer with a best-in-class customer experience,” she added. “Our goal is to be able to fulfill all customer requests and now with 17,500 sq. ft. warehouse we can easily stock a wide offerin...

For 30 years, Cummins and Chrysler have been engaged in one of the most successful mutual

For 30 years, Cummins and Chrysler have been engaged in one of the most successful mutual business ventures in automotive history. Over that time, Cummins has supplied its legendary diesel engines to Chrysler for use in ¾-ton and larger trucks. The Cummins name is credited with having saved Dodge trucks from extinction back in the late ‘80s and more than an 80-percent take-rate applies to the 2500 models Ram sells today. That percentage only goes up with 3500 models. So what was the first Cummins-powered Dodge like? By today’s standards, primitive—but in ’89 the 5.9L I6 was light-years ahead of the competition. The first-generation 5.9L inline-six Cummins engine came stock with 160hp and 400 lb-ft, courtesy of a Holset H1C fixed geometry turbo. The cast-iron block and forged steel rods were well known for their durability, on top of producing big power from its 359 ci of displacement. Even though the 6BT Cummins debuted in the late ‘80s aboard an obviously-dated AD Dodge chassis, it was nothing short of revolutionary. The industrial-intended inline-six packed a turbocharger, direct injection and 400 lb-ft of torque—something neither Ford nor GM offered on their V8 diesels. Join ...

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This website is using a security service to protect itself from online attacks. The service requires full cookie support in order to view the website. This website is using a security service to protect itself from online attacks. The service requires full JavaScript support in order to view the website. This process is automatic, you will be redirected to the requested URL once the validation process is complete. Led Linear Light, Led High Bay Light, Led Linear Fixture, Led Linear Solution – Coreshine,https://www.coreshine.com/

That billowy head of bubbles, long dismissed as empty fluff, is finally getting some attention from

That billowy head of bubbles, long dismissed as empty fluff, is finally getting some attention from American brewers. Bierstadt Lagerhaus, in Denver, takes at least five minutes to pour its Slow Pour Pils.Credit…Benjamin Rasmussen for The New York Times There’s nothing fast about the Slow Pour Pils from Bierstadt Lagerhaus. The Denver brewery spends 30 hours brewing the straw-colored pilsner, ferments it for weeks and, finally, makes its taproom customers wait at least five minutes for a taste. Bartenders pour the pilsner straight into the glass to create foam, then let it subside. They repeat the ritual several times until a lustrous white head rises above the slender cylinder’s rim like a snow-capped mountain. The foam is pomp with a purpose. This slow build releases the prickly, belly-bloating bubbles of carbon dioxide, leaving a smoother, less filling brew. “Beer is the only beverage that makes and keeps foam,” said Ashleigh Carter, the head brewer and an owner. “It speaks to the quality of the beer.” Yet in bars and restaurants across America, servers routinely take care to lay the bottle or spigot against the glass before pouring — an unsanitary method sure to produc...

This is all very normal. I exited my driveway, turned left at the end of our

This is all very normal. I exited my driveway, turned left at the end of our cul-de-sac, then right onto our village’s main two-lane, low-speed thoroughfare, shifted into third and fourth, turned up the satellite radio’s volume, switched the driver’s heated seat on full blast, and finally came to a stop a few kilometres later at a red light. I’m waiting for the light to turn green, thinking that I must remember my excuse (crackers and hummus?) for leaving the house at 9pm at the end of a busy day just so I could drive this bright red, 4-door, 6-speed manual, 210-horsepower, 2015 Volkswagen Golf GTI. But it’s an awfully normal car. It’s not barking or bellowing or champing at the bit. Any gear will do. It’s not announcing the roughness of our coastal roads. I can see out of it. It’s completely tractable. It’s just a Golf. Only a few weeks prior, the 2015 Volkswagen Golf 1.8TSI left me impressed, led me to believe that it was a terrific foundation for a GTI, and generated many more smiles per mile than I anticipated. Now, in mid-December, a week-long Christmas present from Volkswagen Canada seemed very much to be that first car, but with plaid seats, an upgraded ...

McWane set to launch latest factory in Abu Dhabi – Business

Want more construction news and views from the Middle East? Sign up now to receive our specially curated newsletters. USA-based McWane Group is set to launch its fifth valve manufacturing plant and 27th manufacturing facility. The company’s newest factory will be located in Abu Dhabi will produce water, plumbing and sewer products to international specifications, including Ductile Iron Fittings, Valves and Hydrants, Drainage Products and Soil Pipe Fittings and Couplings. Ruffner Page, chief executive officer of McWane, said: “We recognise a significant opportunity to manufacture and supply water, sewer and plumbing products for the Middle East and North Africa regions. “It is our next step towards bringing quality McWane products to even more of the world with our new facility in Abu Dhabi. McWane Gulf has been established to accommodate the growing demand for McWane brands like Kennedy Valves, Tyler and Wade in the Middle East, Africa and Asia.  The Middle East operation, based on 25 acres of land in ICAD -2, Musaffah, Abu Dhabi, comprises a machine shop, fusion bond epoxy (FBE) coating facility, grinding, shot blast, cement lining, welding, prime and epoxy pa...

Thermoplastic composites: Poised to step forward: CompositesWorld

The evolving role of thermoplastic materials and processes and their future in next-generation commercial aircraft. Premium Aerotec’s A320 pressure bulkhead illustrates how the weldability of thermoplastics has the potential to enable larger aircraft components.  At JEC World 2019 GKN Fokker showcased an area-ruled thermoplastic composite fuselage panel — a joint R&D project with Gulfstream Aerospace — that uses welding technology to create a large part. This thermoplastic fuselage panel by GKN Fokker and Gulfstream Aerospace features simple “butt-jointed” orthogrid stiffening and fully welded frames (no fasteners). TPAC and TPRC’s TPC-Cycle project is focused on production scrap from collection to shredding and reprocessing through to application. Thermoplastic composites (TPC) aren’t new to the aerospace sector, but the past couple of years have seen thermoplastic usage in commercial aircraft reach a tipping point. While TPCs have been used for some time for smaller parts such as clips and brackets, or smaller interior components, thermoplastics have been working their way into larger aircraft structures incrementally and now seemed poised to play a bigger role in the futu...